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Category: Featured

Our new Scout Ambassadors are…

Posted on March 15th, 2017 by admin

Some exciting news!

I am delighted to announce that five well-known figures will be joining the Scout Ambassador team, to raise awareness of our invaluable work helping young people develop skills for life.

They are Paralympic gold medallist Ellie Simmonds, Olympic gold medallist Helen Glover, TV presenters Anita Rani and Steve Backshall, and adventurer Megan Hine. They join current Scout Ambassadors, including Chris Evans, Ed Stafford and Julia Bradbury, as positive role models for young people.

Along with our current ambassadors and volunteers, I know they will champion our Scout values and support us in growing the movement, helping more young people develop skills for life.

In addition to introducing our new ambassadors, I’m pleased to announce that Bear Grylls has accepted an offer to remain as Chief Scout until 2020, following a full consultation with the Council of The Scout Association, and a recommendation from the Board of Trustees.

Due to time commitments, local requests for appearances cannot currently be met. Find out more about all our Scout Ambassadors, and what being an ambassador for Scouting means to them.

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT OUR SCOUT AMBASSADORS

Tim Kidd
UK Chief Commissioner

>> Read "Our new Scout Ambassadors are…"


Scouting is not an Organization

Posted on March 7th, 2017 by admin

It is a movement, because it moves forward. As soon as it stops moving, it becomes an Organisation, and is no longer Scouting.

– Baden-Powell

Organizations serve the Scouting movement, but they are not Scouting itself.

There’s a tense relationship between the creative, visionary force behind great ideas like Scouting and the formal organizational framework that facilitates their application.

Movements have an emotional heart. Movements require leaders energized by an idea, a vision. Movements are very hard to stop and are more likely to bring change to the world.

A movement survives events that kill an organization. A movement can skip a generation or two, break into autonomous groups, morph, split and then reunite.

Our first loyalty is the movement not the organizations that contain it. Organizations are vulnerable to error and weakness, they have a lifespan; they are not eternal. Organizations need to be challenged, it’s the only way they can remain faithful to their underlying philosophy.

During the occupation of Poland in WWII the Polish Scouting Organization was outlawed. The Poles didn’t miss a beat. They carried the Scouting movement into the ghettos, the concentration camps, and finally into the diaspora of Poles all over the world. Polish Scouting stayed alive through six decades of Nazi and communist governments.

When Poland was freed from communism the Scouting movement grew into several competing organizations all vying for official recognition; but the movement had survived.

When we keep ourselves centered on Scouting, when we remain faithful to the movement, the troubles and trials of the organization are less unsettling.

If Scouting is valuable it will remain so – there’s really no way to kill it. The organizations formed around it may come and go but the movement at it’s heart will remain strong.

No organization cares about you. Organizations aren’t capable of this …
People, on the other hand, are perfectly capable of caring. It’s part of being a human. It’s only when organizational demands and regulations get in the way that the caring fades.

– Seth Godin

Organizational demands and regulations are rarely flexible enough to answer individual needs without losing organizational identity or purpose.

Most of the tensions and conflicts in any organization spring from bringing the program to the individual; in our case a Scout.

Scouters individualize Scouting by delivering the promises of Scouting to individual Scouts; that is the process of caring.

If organizational demands and regulations become our focus the caring fades.

We cannot comprehend the vision of Scouting by knowing the policies; it is quite the other way around. We first have to catch the vision for the policies to make sense.

All too often our training focuses on adherence to policy and misses the vast, inspiring vision that they frame.

We need organization, we need definition, we need guidance – but they are dead without the vision and inspiration of a movement.

>> Read "Scouting is not an Organization"


Successful First Aid Course Finished at MYC

Posted on February 19th, 2017 by admin

A very successful 16 hour first aid course was run last weekend. There was one day at St. John HQ and one day at MYC for a practical session in an outdoor setting.

16 leaders completed the course and Norman includes a thank you to all the Leaders for giving up their time to attend the course. He wanted to give a special thank you to William Hearnden and Alex Mercer who were our young casualties for the afternoons practical scenarios.

 

>> Read "Successful First Aid Course Finished at MYC"


‘Wolf Pack’ – Southern Explorers, cook with ‘live food’

Posted on February 13th, 2017 by admin

The ‘Wolf Packs’ regular Monday meeting at Mullin ny Carty found them with a blind food cooking challenge.

After being put in teams they tossed a coin to see which of the ‘food boxes’ they were going to cook without seeing what they were getting.  Each box contained real ingredients, utensils and a recipe to follow. The three options ranged from a traditional meat stew to a Scandinavian dish of dauphin potatoes with smoked salmon, onion and dill to a vegetarian option of Pasta a la Christian, which was tagliatelle with blue soft cheese and creme fresh.

Lessons learned:

  1. Some meals take more time to cook than others.
  2. Cutting root vegetables eg: potatoes, onions, carrots into small bits cooks faster but, too small and you end up with soup!
  3. Taking a few minutes to discuss who is going to do what, when saves on gas and  burned or under cooked ingredients.
  4. Getting the Trangias etc. clean after use also takes longer than you might think
All told a tasty and experience gathered evening. Taste wise the salmon dish came out on top but without the dill and using black pepper instead. 

>> Read "‘Wolf Pack’ – Southern Explorers, cook with ‘live food’"


St. George’s Day & The Victor Kneale Trophy

Posted on February 10th, 2017 by admin

Details for the Parade and Service are being finalised and should be out by the end of February.

The Parade and Service for 2017 will be held on Sunday 23 April 2017 (which is the last Sunday of the Easter School Holidays). We are Parading from Victoria Road School, Castletown (leaving at 2:30 pm) to King William’s College. The Service is due to start at about 3:00 pm and Parent Pick Up will be approximately 4:00 pm.

These details are just for your information – full confirmation of timings will be issued in due course.

The Victor Kneale Trophy

The Victor Kneale Trophy is for an annual Arts and Crafts Competition open to all Scouting Sections on the Isle of Man. This year’s competition will be judged on Sunday 23 April 2017, which is the day of the Island St. George’s Day Parade. All entries will help form part of the Parade. The Competition this year is to design a Flag or Banner.

Download complete information here Victor Kneale Competition 2017

 

>> Read "St. George’s Day & The Victor Kneale Trophy"


Woodbadge Training Saturday, 14 January

Posted on January 9th, 2017 by admin

Modules 8 (Skills of Leadership) & 14 (Supporting Young People)

Even if you already have your Woodbadge, come down for a refresher.

As usual venue is:
1st Douglas Scout Hall,
Demesne Road,
Douglas
 
13:00 Registration and coffee
13:15 Module 8 – Skills of Leadership
15:30 Module 14 – Supporting Young People
17:30 Finish

>> Read "Woodbadge Training Saturday, 14 January"


The first Skills ‘n’ Chills newsletter available

Posted on January 2nd, 2017 by admin

The first Skills ‘n’ Chills newsletter is available on the North West Scouts website. Come and join other adult volunteers in the North West at the Regional Skills ‘n’ Chill weekend!

Over 115 leaders (incl. 2 from the IOM) have already registered to come to the Isle of Man 28th April to 1st May (bank holiday weekend). You can register from the website.

This fantastic weekend will be a great opportunity for you to do some activities you’ve never done before, meet people from around the Region and have you own adventure! The weekend is yours with your drop-in activity sessions, so make the most of it!

 

>> Read "The first Skills ‘n’ Chills newsletter available"


Reminder of training on Saturday, 10 December

Posted on December 3rd, 2016 by admin
A reminder of the training session on Saturday, 10 December for module 12a & b. Session will be at 1st Douglas at 1:30-3:30. It’s open to all, no one on the island has these modules validated. Modules’ focus is programme planning & reviewing, incorporating youth led scouting and #YouShape.
 
They will be running two groups in the session, one for Wood Badge and one for the management modules.
Module lead by Izzy Dorman, Island Youth Commissioner.

>> Read "Reminder of training on Saturday, 10 December"


‘Wolf Pack’ – Southern Explorers finsh the job

Posted on November 29th, 2016 by admin

dscf1110-1On Sunday The Explorers of the “Wolf Pack’ finished the construction of their equipment locker. They now have a safe, dry place to store all their camping and ancillary equipment. This is due to the kindness of one of the units feeder Scout Troops. 1st Malew, based at Ballasalla, have given up a corner of their loft storage space for the Explorers use.

To ensure each section’s equipment doesn’t get mixed up the Explorers constructed a cage and shelving. The vast majority of the timber used was obtained from the Port Erin re-cycle centre. The door hinges, screws and door bolt were recycled from ESL Roger’s garage spares box. The most expensive part of the construction was buying the ‘chicken wire’.

A big ‘Thank You’ to 1st. Malew.

>> Read "‘Wolf Pack’ – Southern Explorers finsh the job"


One Minute Scout Leader

Posted on November 18th, 2016 by admin

Kenneth Blanchard and Spencer Johnson’s bestselling book The One Minute Manager concentrates on brief, focused management through goal setting, encouragement and correction. One minute methods work well for Scout Leaders: (adapted from an essay by Winston R. Davis, author of Men of Schiff)

There was a bright young man looking for a really good Scout Leader.

He wanted to work for one.  He wanted to become one.

He found some who said: “I keep my Scouts in line! If you let up on them, they just get in trouble. We make ’em shape up!” Their troops were usually impressive:  good uniforming, behavior and skills. But the Scouts in their troops didn’t seem to be having much fun.  The only ones having a good time were just like their Scout Leaders. They said: “We know how to make these kids behave. We don’t let ’em get away with a thing!”

There were others he found who  were easygoing and likable, friendly and quiet.  Many said,  “Oh, life is too short to hassle these kids. I let them pretty much decide what they want to do. That’s the patrol method. They know what they need.” The Scouts in their Troops didn’t appear doing anything that was in their Scout books.  Hardly any complete uniforms. Lots of goofing around and having a great time. Troop activities were noisy and looked like fun, but not everybody could participate. Younger Scouts seemed confused and unable to get any help.

The young man wasn’t happy with what he had seen.

He knew a good Scout Leader would run his troop so that the girls and boys would have a good time and learn some things. There wouldn’t be a lot of time wasted on noisy confusion. They could get right down to the business of doing exciting and interesting things. Scouts would earn a lot of badges, win a lot of contests and have fun doing it.

He began hearing wonderful things about a Scout Leader who lived not far from him; he found the One-Minute Scout Leader.

The OMSL believes that boys who feel good about themselves do good things.  He knows that “Goals begin behavior; consequences maintain behavior.”  For that reason, he uses one-minute goal setting, one minute praising and one minute reprimands.

Scout-age girls and boys thrive on the one minute concept: they are not fond of too much abstract thinking, lengthy goal making or evaluation.

They know when they mess up, and expect to be corrected, but they can do without a lecture. They like goals that are succinct, understandable, reachable and measurable. If they don’t buy into the goals, they won’t be too excited about making them happen.

Naturally there will be mistakes. The one minute reprimand is only given for a significant mistake. It  is short, unemotional, specific. It emphasizes that the leader realizes the girl or boy is a good person capable of better things. The behavior is criticized, not the Scout.

The OMSL actively looks for opportunities to make one minute praisings. As with the reprimand, a girl or boy is told specifically what it was that he did to earn the praise, and how really good that makes the OMSL feel. Both praising and reprimanding are “up close and personal,” looking the Scout directly in the eye.

The young man attends one of the OMSL’s Troop meetings. He finds lots of girls and boys in Scout uniform engaged in some fun pre-opening activities. There are adults around, but they don’t seem to be involved in the action.

A sharp-looking thirteen year old introduces herself as Ronda, the Senior Patrol Leader. “So, you’ve met the Old Man,” she says.

“Yeah, the One-Minute Scoutmaster.  That’s a lotta bunk, isn’t it?”

“No way,” Ronda replies.  “Everybody thinks that at first, though!”

“Well,” responds the young man, “I guess you guys will have to prove it. What happens when the adults take charge of the meeting?”

“They don’t, the patrol leaders and I, along with some of the others run the meeting. Except in emergencies the adults never step in unless we ask or for one-minute praisings. He’ll have a time at the end of the meeting to leave us with a final thought. It’s . . . ”

“Don’t tell me it’s a One-Minute Scout Leader’s Minute!”

“You got it!  He never takes more than about ninety seconds to speak his piece.  He says if you can’t say it in two or three minutes, you haven’t thought enough about what you want to say,”  was the girl’s reply.

“Yeah, but he must have a lot to say to the boy leaders after the meeting, right?” the young man suggested.

“Not really,” Ronda said.  “There is a Patrol Leader’s Council meeting after every meeting. A short one. But we do almost all the talking. We review the meeting, note any foul-ups and check plans for the next meeting or activity. The Old Man only talks if he needs to give a One-Minute praising.”

“Aha!” said the young man.  “Or, no doubt, a One-Minute reprimand?”

“Those happen only in private.  He never reprimands us in front of each other because it makes you feel humiliated and resentful. The only reason for the reprimand is to get us to behave differently in the future.  He only criticizes the thing we did and not us and, since the reprimand ends with a praising . . . ”

“Just a minute.  He reprimands and praises you?  How does that work?”

The young man saw he still had a long way to go. “After he finishes telling you exactly what you did wrong, and how it makes him feel, and giving you a moment to feel how it feels, he tells you what a great person you are and how much he likes you, and you know it’s over.” Ronda’s admiration for the man showed in her face. “I only wish we could get the Old Man to teach all our teachers to do the same thing. A lot of them use what he calls the ‘gunny sack’ approach. They save up a lot of frustration–and boy do they get a lot of frustration–until they have enough to fill a sack! Then they just dump it all over everybody. The guilty and the innocent get punished or yelled at all together.

The young man was still puzzled. “Okay, let’s go back a minute. If you all do everything without the SL’s guidance, how do you know what to do at meetings and activities?”

“I thought you’d want to know that.” Ronda grinned. “It’s really simple. We know because we all sit down together and plan everything. We mostly come up with the program plan, but he provides the materials and some suggestions. But everybody has to agree on what we’re going to do, and everything we agree to gets written down. Everybody keeps a copy so that there’s no doubt later of who agreed to do what.

It takes a lot of work for us, but we get to do what we want to do, not what a bunch of adults think we should.”

“But you don’t get to do just anything do you?”

“Definitely not! Whatever we do  we have to convince the Old Man that it could be done without compromising health and safety standards, is consistent with the goals we have set and  that it was what everyone in the troop wanted and not just us.”

Ronda looked thoughtful. “I don’t think there’s any idea we couldn’t at least talk about. And when the talking was over, we would know whether it was a good idea and exactly why it was or wasn’t.”

These methods will go a long way towards maintaining a dynamic, happy Troop.

>> Read "One Minute Scout Leader"



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